AP European History

Greenwood and Warren East AP European Forum
 
HomeHome  CalendarCalendar  FAQFAQ  SearchSearch  MemberlistMemberlist  UsergroupsUsergroups  RegisterRegister  Log in  

Share | 
 

 Chapter 21 Discussion

Go down 
AuthorMessage
Mrs.Gupton
Admin
avatar

Posts : 131
Join date : 2010-07-13

PostSubject: Chapter 21 Discussion   Tue Jan 10, 2012 9:59 pm

What were the major causes in the Revolutions of 1848? How did these revolutions set the "chess board" for the upcoming war games to come?
Back to top Go down
http://apeuroghs.boardonly.com
James.Grzywacz



Posts : 12
Join date : 2011-08-09
Age : 22

PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   Tue Jan 10, 2012 10:36 pm

James haves

Through much of the early nineteenth century, there had been major food shortages, poor grain and potato harvests, and the blight in Ireland caused detrimental famine that drove the Irish to many other parts of Europe. Also, the industry and economy were depressed and struggling to start anew. There was wide spread unemployment yet the poor relief systems were far overburdened. All of these combined issues raised frustration and discontent in the artisan and working classes.
At the close of the revolutions of 1848, the revolutions had failed to establish neither a national nor liberal states. The liberals isolated themselves and refused to follow any political revolution with social reform. This isolation made the liberals an easy prey for future armies of the reactionary class.

What are the main ideas of Marxism and how common and successful were they among the European population?
Back to top Go down
Ashten2014



Posts : 26
Join date : 2011-08-04

PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   Tue Jan 10, 2012 11:37 pm

Mine!



The main ideas of Marxism was to abolish private property and put an end to class antagonisms. Marxism wasn't successful in its revolts in the beginning however Marxism greatly influenced politics to come such as the revolutions of 1848 and it remains an influential piece. Overall Marxism was a lot like the other isms of the time all looking for change.

What were the Corn laws and how did they influence Europe, why were they repealed?
Back to top Go down
Molly.Swack



Posts : 29
Join date : 2011-08-09

PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:08 am

MINE.
Back to top Go down
Molly.Swack



Posts : 29
Join date : 2011-08-09

PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:17 am

The Corn Laws were the British tariffs placed on the imported grain that protected the price of grain that was grown in the British Isles. The Corn Laws were repealed because Sir Robert Peel decided he must open other British ports for foreign grains, so that could feed the poor, starving Irish people.


How do Anarchism and Owenism differ? How are they alike, if at all? Describe both.
Back to top Go down
14hjsewell



Posts : 24
Join date : 2011-08-08

PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:36 am

mine
Back to top Go down
MariahMoeyM



Posts : 15
Join date : 2011-09-30

PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:38 am

Owenism was a type of utopian socialism which stated that happy workers in good conditions would be more productive. Anarchism rejected socialism AND capitalism. Often the practictioners of anarchism were prone to terrorist tendencies whilst Owenists were fairly peaceful.

QUESTION: What did the Frankfurt Parliment do?
Back to top Go down
14hjsewell



Posts : 24
Join date : 2011-08-08

PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:40 am

mine

I dont see how Anarchism and Owenism are alike. Anarchism doesnt want any sort of government and definitely no interference with life and they also dont want a industry. Owenism all came about as a result of the poor conditions of the factories. Owenism preaches that there can be humane conditions for people to work in and still make a profit.
Actually, they do agree in one way...they are an "-ism". Hah!



How is Saint-Simonism different than Socialism? Explain both and compare/contrast.
Back to top Go down
AmandaMiller



Posts : 22
Join date : 2011-05-21
Age : 22

PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   Wed Jan 11, 2012 9:33 am

Both socialists and saint simonists believed that society should be organized and managed more than the classical economists believed. They both also believed that human society should be organized as a community rather as selfish individuals.

Socialists focused on theredistribution of goods while the saint simonists were more extreme on the fact that things needed to be managed under a higher authority than just the owner.









Why did Marx's ideas remain so influential during the second half of the nineteenth century and on when his theory didn't even prove to be correct?
Back to top Go down
Troy Palmer



Posts : 13
Join date : 2011-08-22

PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   Wed Jan 11, 2012 6:23 pm

Mine

Marx's ideas were, at the time of their publication, just another addition to the many political theories of the time. However, Marxism ended up having a great influence on the world. Its appeal came from the fact that everyone would become equal in his society, something that was definitely not true at the time. Also, his reason wasn't just based on pure opinion; he used historical evidence and empiricism to come to his conclusions. This became very appealing as science became more influential during the second half of the 19th century. But, total human liberation was the main draw for its popularity, which is why many 20th century governments attempted a Marxist-style government. The flaws of these governments were that the despot who had power never gave it up, so the proletariat didn't cease to exist, preventing human liberation. That was the biggest reason that Marxist-style government attempts failed.

What was the French Second Republic and how did it happen? cheers Basketball
Back to top Go down
sumi5

avatar

Posts : 15
Join date : 2011-08-12

PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   Wed Jan 11, 2012 7:44 pm

I got Troy's.


The French Second Republic was where Louis Phille and Guizot organized political banquets, which were used to criticize the government. Because the poor harvests, it led to more support thus, the government forbade banquets on February 22, 1848. The workers then paraded in the streets the next day calling for a reform. Then Guizota resigned and Louise was abdicated on February 24th. This led to the election to new legislature Napoleon III.



What was the English Factory Act of 1833 and how did it change the structure of the home?


Last edited by sumi5 on Wed Jan 11, 2012 8:09 pm; edited 2 times in total
Back to top Go down
nick13



Posts : 6
Join date : 2011-11-14

PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   Wed Jan 11, 2012 8:02 pm

i got sumis

The english factory act forbade children under the age of 9 to be employed,it limited the workday for chilkdren 9-13 to nine hours a day,and required the factory owners to pay for two hours of education a day for children. The effect was to divide work and home life.





What was the maygar revolt and how did it effect the people?
Back to top Go down
Jessica_Johnson



Posts : 13
Join date : 2011-08-16

PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   Wed Jan 11, 2012 8:13 pm

Mine
the Vienna revolt helped lead Magyar leaders of Hungary to pass the March laws with the help of Ferdinand which led to the magyar revolt. The Magyars also wanted to establish a seperate Hungarian state. They attempted to annex Transylvania and other eastern habsburg empires. This would of brought these people under Magyar government. These groups resisted because of government and language. Count Joseph jellachich invaded Hungary in support of the national groups. It showed liberalism against nationalism.

Explain why cities and peoples movement to them had such an impact on crime
Back to top Go down
ElviraDzafic



Posts : 22
Join date : 2011-06-13
Age : 21

PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   Wed Jan 11, 2012 11:50 pm

MINEMINEMINE

Cities and migration of people to cities did greatly impact the crime rate. This is so because of various reasons. To start off, people would move to the cities for jobs. With this vast majority of people moving to the city, overpopulation quickly occurred across the cities. With overpopulation comes crowded cities, and people are fighting for survival, literally. You could get hurt so quickly in these days, whether it was for a piece of bread or even for the clothes on your back; the people were so desperate, they'd do anything to stay alive. Obviously there weren’t enough jobs for EVERY single person, so some were stuck at home, needing to do something to get money. Usually, people would turn to theft, a quick way to get some cash in their hands. That’s pretty much it, there’s not a heavy description to give on the topic, just kind of common sense. Once people have nothing to do and get bored, they’re going to want to try something “exciting” to feed their emotions and thrill their lives, to give themselves meaning in a way.

Describe the various socialistic views.
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Chapter 21 Discussion   

Back to top Go down
 
Chapter 21 Discussion
Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
AP European History :: AP European History :: Chapter Discussion-
Jump to: