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 Chapter One Discussion

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Mrs.Gupton
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PostSubject: Chapter One Discussion    Thu Aug 11, 2011 3:48 pm

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Warfare, plague, and conflicts within the Catholic Church made the late Middle Ages a difficult period for nearly everyone. The long and exhausting Hundred Years’ War between England and France had dramatic consequences in both countries. What were the long term consequences from these historical events for Western Europe? What technological and political changes tipped the old balances of power?

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Ashten2014



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Thu Aug 11, 2011 5:21 pm

ill take this one

The long term changes that happened after the Hundred year war are that the French noticed that the feudal monarchy was not working as well as they would have liked in the end a new French government was born as a result of the war. Also the English noticed that the Monarchies were becoming more effective so they stuck with that. The French were probably hurt most by the war because their farmland was damaged by the fighting. The English parliament however improved when new technologies were created in warfare such as new weapons, since they were in charge of taxes the assisted in the improvement of the English war tactics.


heres a question for someone else.....
When the plague struck we know it wiped out 2/3 of Europe population, but what did it do the economy and the agricultural side of things?
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14hchughes



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Thu Aug 11, 2011 9:38 pm

I'll take it.



The economy during the Plague was good for some and bad for others. It helped peasants and farm laborers but it was worse for landholders. There weren’t as many people who were able to work the farms, so wages for farm laborers increased. The prices for farm goods decreased because of low demand. The price for rent decreased as well. However, the products that skilled artisans made rose in price. People who owned land suffered during this time because they had to pay their workers more and it didn’t get as much product out of it.


A question for someone else...
Did the plague change Christians' views on their religion and the church, did they view it as a punishment from God?


Last edited by 14hchughes on Mon Aug 15, 2011 5:11 pm; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : A little vague on your answers... can you expand it a little more??? (Mrs. Gupton))
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ElviraDzafic



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Fri Aug 12, 2011 4:30 pm

I got this one!!


Although some Christians were opposed to the church, others were intrigued by it. Some peasants went to the church because they wanted religious services for the dead and dying, others were scared of it. A majority of the people turned to the church for a cure though. Some people also rebelled against the church and held protests against it; the church suffered as a landholder and politically. Some Christians and churches blamed the plague on the Jewish, saying that they worked for the devil and poisoned the waters. No one had the same views; everybody had their own opinions so you can’t really say that all Christians’ views were changed. To the other half of the question, yes, some people did view the Black Death as a punishment from God for their sins. To try to get rid of it, the flagellants would walk barefoot all throughout Europe and whip themselves to try to get the evil out.


somebody else...
May you please tell me how the economy gained back its revenues after the black death and how this affected the later years?
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HunterCooper



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Fri Aug 12, 2011 5:21 pm

MINE!

After the Bubonic plague hit the economy was severely damaged and took a while to bounce back. But, since so many people had died there was a surplus of food making the price go down, and there was a shortage of workers making wages go up (and by making wages go up, the economy gained back some revenue). So, whoever did make it through the plague had a relatively successful and happy life. Also, after the plague was gone, the elite started to discontinue using serfs as workers and started to let them buy their way to freedom. This, consequently, raised the economy, because there were more people to spend money at stores and to buy or rent houses.

Question:
We all know that peasants were most of the victims of the Bubonic Plague, but how did the Plague take a toll on the elite of Europe and how did they deal with it?
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C_Wezzy Khounxay



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Sun Aug 21, 2011 2:16 pm

This is mine.

The Black Plague affected the elites in Western Europe greatly. Some affects of the plague were that farmers were dying, which decreased farm labor; this affected the nobles by making them pay for more and more farm labor. Also, luxury, manufactured goods, and the work of skilled artisans, skilled manual worker who makes items that may be functional or strictly decorative, including furniture, clothing, jewellery, household items, and tools, rose dramastically. Some landholders suffered the lost of power. The landlords had to pay a high price for finished products and farm labor, but only received a small return on their agricultural produces, because the farm labor were dying from the plague. Peasant revolts in England and France sparked up when new taxes and laws were passed; the taille, direct taxes against the peasantry and was imposed on each household and based on how much land it held, increased. The only thing good about the plague was that rent declined everywhere after it was over. Finally, if some high nobles, such as kings, died in small cities, there would be chaos among the people; because it would be a challenge to pick a new ruler among small cities.

Question:
We all know that the Great Schism (1378-1417) was when the cardinals, in Roma, elected an Italian archbishop, Pope Urban II. Also, the cardinals of France elected their own pope, Pope Clement VII, five months after Pope Urban VII was elected in Roma. Which means there were two popes during the same time. Why did the king of France, Charles V, wanted to keep the papacy, recognizes the pope as the supreme head, of the pope in France? Also, what were the time between and overall affects of this Great Schism? Finally, what order ended the Great Schism and how did this powerful order accomplish this action of the ending of the Great Schism?


Last edited by C_Wezzy Khounxay on Wed Aug 24, 2011 11:44 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Katie L



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Mon Aug 22, 2011 7:39 pm

I’ll take this question.

The reason King Charles V of France wanted to keep the papacy in France was because with a French pope on his side he would have considerably more power. Most European countries were united by their religion, and the church had lots of power over all of its subjects. The Great Schism lasted for almost 30 years and created the idea of conciliar theory, which was the idea that the church should have a representative council to make sure the pope didn’t have too much power. The order that ended the Schism was the Sacrosanct, which established a new pope, Martin V, declared by the council of Constance.

Question: During the Hundred Years War, what advantages did the English have over the French and how did this affect the outcome of the wars?
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ericspiller



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Tue Aug 23, 2011 4:17 pm

Mine

One advantage was that the English infantry was very disciplined and the archers were very accurate and used a new weapon called the longbow, which had enough force to hit a knight from 200 yards away. The combination of these 2 things would usually decimate the French army.

Question: France had three times the population of England, it was wealthier, and it fought on its own soil. So why did most of the major battles end in an English victory?
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14hjsewell



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Tue Aug 23, 2011 5:49 pm

i got it Eric!


The first disaster for the French was not actually fought on French soil; It was on English Seas. In 1340, the French decided to send a massive fleet carrying a large amount of soldiers to attack the English allies in Flounders. But the English attacked the fleet of the coast of Sluys. This now gave the English control of the Channel and freedom to invade both North and South with ease. The English army was now a mixed force of infantry, archers, pikemen and light cavalry who were hardened as a result of the fighting between them and the Scots and Welsh. Throw in the mercenaries and the English army was arguably THE best fighting force in the world. The second disaster for the French came as a result of the Longbow. In 1346, the English began to grow tired from sickness and travel and decided to take a last stand at Crecy. The French Knights charged up the hill but were slaughtered by the Longbow before they could do much harm. The third disaster was losing the city of Calais to the English. The city was fortified and this now gave the English a command post inside of French territory. In the book it also mentions the French depreciating the currency and borrowing vast amounts of money from Italian Bankers.


What do you think is the most important thing Joan of Arc did? Why? How do you think she would have impacted the world today if she had not done what she did? What is something about her name that is different than all other women at that time?
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Hollie Austin



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Wed Aug 24, 2011 7:42 am

I got this


I think the most important thing Joan did was liberate the Orleans because not only did it help to make the kingdom more united,it also led to the end of the nine year disheritage presented by the treaty of Troyes. I believe if she had not done what she did that throughout history less woman would have felt motivated to be active in war and some countries greatest victories are attributed to woman; and I'm not sure what you mean about her name because at that time se didn't really go by Joan of Arc.

Although France's population and army was larger than that of the English,why did the English have so many victories over them? Give an example. How does this reflect on a later English war?
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Alexander Smith



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Wed Aug 24, 2011 4:18 pm

To start with Tactically Edward had a strong position, with the French caught in a, maneuver known as a nutcracker, between Edward's lands held as Duke of Aquitaine in the south and his Flemish and other allies in the north. Henry III also had a simple but extremely effective tool known as the long bow. This in many cases gave the English the upper hand over the French. One such battle that the long bow played a decisive role in the outcome of the battle was at Agincourt when Henry V had an army that was 5/6 longbow archers. The English were out numbered 6/1 however the strength of the English long bow in a way evened out the numbers for the English cavalry.

Question:

What were the economic Benefits and disadvantages for both England and France during and after the Hundred Years' War.
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14hjsewell



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Wed Aug 24, 2011 9:12 pm

Hollie Austin wrote:
I got this


I think the most important thing Joan did was liberate the Orleans because not only did it help to make the kingdom more united,it also led to the end of the nine year disheritage presented by the treaty of Troyes. I believe if she had not done what she did that throughout history less woman would have felt motivated to be active in war and some countries greatest victories are attributed to woman; and I'm not sure what you mean about her name because at that time se didn't really go by Joan of Arc.

Although France's population and army was larger than that of the English,why did the English have so many victories over them? Give an example. How does this reflect on a later English war?

(You answered it. She didn't really go by Joan of Arc. She called herself Joan the maid and historians later called her Joan of Arc.) -Hunter
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AmandaMiller



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Thu Aug 25, 2011 8:39 pm

this is MINE!!!!!
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AmandaMiller



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Thu Aug 25, 2011 8:57 pm

The French did seem to have an advantage over the English in numbers, but they didn’t have quality people working with them. Even though the French had more soldiers, the English had more skilled soldiers who were willing to fight for them for pay. They also had a more efficient government, which gave them a great advantage. The war also took place in England, which gave them an advantage because they knew all of the land they were fighting on. They knew where to hide out,where to attack from and what areas to avoid.









How are Joan of Arc and Hans Behem alike? Do you think they really believed that God was on there side, or were they just crying wolf? How did Joanof Arc know which saints were whispering in her ear?
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Molly.Swack



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Thu Aug 25, 2011 9:46 pm

I Got this one!!!
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Molly.Swack



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Thu Aug 25, 2011 10:01 pm

Hans and Joan were both very similar. Although before they were well known, they were both low people, (Hans being a street urchin and Joan being a teenage peasant) they were obviously well educated in religious areas, or they wouldn’t have known which saints were most famous, and which ones would draw most public attention. I also believe that both Hans Behem and Joan of Arc were faking the whole thing.


Question…
How did the Hundred Years’ War effect the countries participating in it? Give a general summary of the war.
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ehook4



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PostSubject: Re: Chapter One Discussion    Thu Aug 25, 2011 10:04 pm

THIS ONE'S MINE!!!!!

The Hundred Years’ War devastated France, but awakened new French nationalism and sped up their transition from a feudal monarchy to a centralized state. The English also decided to develop their own clothing industry and foreign markets. But in both France and England, the effects of the war fell most heavily on the peasantry who were forced to support it with taxes and services. The first major event in the Hundred Years War was the English Victory at the Bay of Sluys in 1340, followed by their victory at Crecy and the seizure of Calais in 1346. When the Black Death struck England in 1347 the English withdrew from the war for a while but returned with a victory at Poitiers in 1356. In 1420, the Treaty of Troyes recognized the English king as heir to the French throne. In 1422 Henry VI was proclaimed king of both England and France. In 1453 the war ended and England retained only Calais.

How did the plague affect the importance of skilled artisans? How did this help the artisan and trade guilds win political power?
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